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#26 2013-02-28 11:29:16

wizard10000
#! Member
Registered: 2013-02-24
Posts: 80

Re: First things you do after a fresh install?

First #! install but the process would be exactly like any other distro that uses apt as a package manager (I came from Debian).

  1. Make sure I have a good backup of anything I can't afford to lose.

  2. Copy /etc into my home directory.  If I have any content in /var (I usually don't) stop relevant daemons and copy that as well.

  3. Insure I have dump of installed packages with dpkg --get-selections > packagelist.txt  (I run this as a nightly cron job but check to make sure it's there and current.)

  4. Install new distro, preserving my home partition.

  5. Make sure networking works.

  6. Log out of X and into a root terminal session.

  7. Restore dump of previous package list with dpkg --set-selections < packagelist.txt

  8. Restore relevant configurations to /etc and any content to /var

  9. Reinstall my applications with apt-get update && apt-get dselect-upgrade

All done  smile

Last edited by wizard10000 (2013-02-28 11:49:29)


we see things not as they are, but as we are.
  -- anais nin

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Be excellent to each other!

#27 2013-02-28 11:53:54

el_koraco
#!/loony/bun
From: inside Ed
Registered: 2011-07-25
Posts: 4,747

Re: First things you do after a fresh install?

I usually install distros without X. If it's easy enough, I try to install and configure zsh (switched to ohmyzsh, it's easier to configure than gmrl's config, and it's more distro-neutral), syslinux and vim during the install process. Once I've rebooted to the new system, I install X and the relevant drivers like intel and synaptic, and Gnome with all the bells and whistles (Evolution, Evince, Disks, everything). Enable systemd's readahead, set up my online account, restore Evolution's preferences from backup, make fstab entries for my music and video LVM volumes and off we go.

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#28 2013-03-05 09:31:06

Microcord
#! Member
Registered: 2011-03-13
Posts: 61

Re: First things you do after a fresh install?

  1. Go to the Crunchbang wiki page "KEYBOARD Swapping the CapsLock and the left Ctrl keys"

  2. Copy the text within it; paste this to ~/.Xmodmap; save

  3. Log out; log back in

  4. Contentedly use a sensibly arranged keyboard

Well, that worked for Statler all three times I installed that. Today I installed Waldorf for the first time, and it didn't work. sad CapsLock and Ctrl remain the (to me) silly way around. Damn.

[jumping up and down with beetroot colored face emoticon]

Oh yes, and go to the Crunchbang wiki page "LOCALES enable Japanese input" and, surprise surprise, enable Japanese input. That did work today, perfectly. (Though there are some minor changes I'd make to the wiki page to bring it up to date, if only the wiki page were still updatable.)

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#29 2013-03-05 16:12:14

cortman
#! CrunchBanger
From: ZZ9 Plural Z Alpha
Registered: 2012-03-15
Posts: 128

Re: First things you do after a fresh install?

I change the menu, install LibreOffice, Zsh, and change the gtk/openbox themes. Other than that it comes with pretty much everything I need.
Oh, and install the couple FF extensions I can't live without.


Copy.com offers 15 GB free cloud storage plus 5 GB extra for both of us when you use my my referral link. smile

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#30 2013-03-05 20:28:51

stratoka
Member
From: Csíkszereda
Registered: 2012-11-16
Posts: 15

Re: First things you do after a fresh install?

1. Update Sources & System
2. Remove unused apps
3. Configure tint2, openbox menu, download favorite themes/icons.
4. Install preferred apps & Firefox
5. Log in to #! forums and stare at other peoples setup, and have a lot of fun!


Linux poses a real challenge for those with a taste for late-night
hacking (and/or conversations with God).   -Matt Welsh-

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#31 2013-03-17 22:20:15

nabu
Member
Registered: 2011-03-30
Posts: 24

Re: First things you do after a fresh install?

1. Restore all important home dir folders and files that dwell on the backup drive, to the current home dir. This saves huge tweak time.
2. Download latest Firefox nightly build, Opera, Google Chrome, Skype, XnViewMP, Nvidia + cuda drivers.
3. Start my little .sh script that wipes off Iceweasel, Transmission, and installs rTorrent, Unrar Nonfree, Xbmc Media Center, Audacious (and couple of minor utilities).
4. Install downloaded apps from step 2, and Install some proprietary apps for pro usage.
5. Clean temps and app-cache, check deborphan for orphans.

So, this is the first, and usually the last thing that I do to a system, for after that I just use it without worry.

All five steps are done for an hour more or less, so I never hesitate to do a fresh install, although I do that rarely - nothing gets wrong to that extent - I am pretty satisfied with the #!

Long live Corenominal  kiss

Last edited by nabu (2013-03-17 22:22:25)

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#32 2013-03-18 00:56:18

arinlares
Member
From: California
Registered: 2009-11-10
Posts: 30

Re: First things you do after a fresh install?

In order:

  1. Upgrade packages (assuming I have the time)

  2. Install Vim (I hate nano, and am not sure what vim.tiny is in Debian)

  3. Install/Configurea couple of games from the repos.  Set up browser

  4. [In the case of pre-configured distros] Clean out apps I don't want/need or replace with apps I prefer, and feel a little bad doing it.

  5. Enjoy new system.

Last edited by arinlares (2013-03-18 00:56:40)

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#33 2013-03-18 07:00:09

uname
#! Junkie
Registered: 2013-03-15
Posts: 335

Re: First things you do after a fresh install?

I never installed CrunchBang. I only use it from a multiboot usb-stick. Mostly i install Debian from GRML (grml-boostrap). I use a directory tree for all configurations like normal structures  (etc,home, ...) with all necessary information (e.g. ~/.config/openbox) and a package list. This is not my normal backup, it is a template for all installations.
After installing Debian i install my packages from the list like xserver-xorg, openbox, tint2, nitrogen, vim, screen, ... and rsync or tar files in the correct directorys.
The advantage of a template is the easy possibilty to optimize the configuration. All in all there a perhaps 20 or 30 files for building a nice Debian system. Ok the packages of the CrunchBang-repository ( http://packages.crunchbang.org/waldorf/pool/main ) are missing (i do not use it in sources.list). My systems are real Debian systems with nice features from Crunchbang (e.g. Waldorf-openbox-theme).

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#34 2013-03-18 08:50:37

zalew
#! Junkie
From: Warsaw, .PL
Registered: 2012-03-28
Posts: 374

Re: First things you do after a fresh install?

- restore backuped .ssh
- grab all the things (dotfiles, install scripts, etc.) from my git repos
- switch to zsh
- run smxi
- sync mozilla and sign in to gmail
only then I feel at home and can start taking care of anything else

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#35 2013-03-25 21:07:03

sysaxed
#! Member
Registered: 2013-03-25
Posts: 60

Re: First things you do after a fresh install?

cb-welcome script!

Move to sid

Add experimental sources

Install thunar from experimental repository (this gives you ability to use TABS!)

Modify conky:
CPU frequency:$alignr${freq} MHz
CPU temperature:$alignr$acpitemp°C

Modify tint2:
systray_sort = descending #this one seems to be better
Make right click to close programs (mouse_right = close)
Change clock to display date (time2_format = %a %d %b and time2_font = Liberation Sans 7)
Move it to bottom (panel_position = bottom center horizontal)
To make top right corner work as a close button, you will have to change top margin in openbox GUI config tool to 0

Change keyboard layout in /etc/default/keyboard

Install perWindowLayoutD to keep layouts for windows separately. Don't forget to add it to autostart

Install kupfer!!! This one is important.

Install speedcrunch as calculator

Install readahead-fedora this will speed up your boot time twice.

Last edited by sysaxed (2013-03-25 22:36:58)

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