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#1 2014-11-09 20:07:10

schwim
#! Die Hard
From: Interweb's #1 Devotee
Registered: 2012-10-11
Posts: 1,031
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[SOLVED] Finding out what's starting a process or service

Hi there folks,

This is on an Ubuntu 14.10 minimal install with OB.  I'm getting a lot of notification-daemon crashes and it seems from the bug reports that it's a thing for Ubu/OB.  What I can't figure out, however, is what's starting the process.  Googling results in renaming the file in /usr/share/dbus-1/services, but I have looked in every subfolder of dbus-1 and the file in question does not exist. My OB autostart does not deal with the notification-daemon either.

So I'm wondering where I might find the system that handles the startup. I don't mind a GUI tool, but the tools I'm finding via Ubu help channels want to install either a whole Gnome 3 or Unity deal.  I'd like to handle this with as little fanfare as possible.

Any thoughts would be welcome.  Thanks for your time!

Last edited by schwim (2014-11-12 13:34:33)

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#2 2014-11-09 23:57:23

gutterslob
#! Resident Bum
Registered: 2009-11-03
Posts: 3,207

Re: [SOLVED] Finding out what's starting a process or service

Is this the bug report you spoke of?

So I assume you just want to disable the notifications daemon altogether?
Haven't used Ubuntu (or Gnome or Unity) in years, so this is just a shot in the dark after some searching, since no one else has replied yet.

1. Is it possible that your login/display manager (GDM, LightDM, etc) is starting the notification-daemon? If so, maybe look at that particular .conf or session file? I'm doubtful after looking at the bug report, though.

2. Maybe you can try gsettings and see if it lists anything related to notify-osd or notification-daemon?

Sorry, that's all I can seem to find. Like I said, shot in the dark.


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#3 2014-11-10 01:20:58

schwim
#! Die Hard
From: Interweb's #1 Devotee
Registered: 2012-10-11
Posts: 1,031
Website

Re: [SOLVED] Finding out what's starting a process or service

Thanks  a bunch for your help, gutterslob.  I am terrible at providing sufficient info in my initial thread.  I meant to add that I'm not using a DM at all.  I edited tty1.conf to log in automatically, then created a bash_profile to have it startx immediately upon login.

I will take a look at gsettings and see if it can work some magic for me.  Thanks a bunch!

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#4 2014-11-10 14:18:29

gutterslob
#! Resident Bum
Registered: 2009-11-03
Posts: 3,207

Re: [SOLVED] Finding out what's starting a process or service

^ Okay, so you can pretty much rule out any login manager starting the process.

Did you check /etc/init.d/ or /etc/rc{runlevel}.d/ for anything notification related? Not sure how much has changed over the years, but I recall seeing notification services of some sort being located there back in the Ubuntu 8.xx and 9.xx days. Seeing as Ubuntu still (afaik) runs upstart, you might be able to find some clue in those directories. Easy method would be to run rcconf (may need to install it, no deps afaik) and see what's listed, or possibly sysv-rc-conf. Again, just my uneducated guesswork based on past/outdated experience.

Last edited by gutterslob (2014-11-10 16:43:24)


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#5 2014-11-12 13:34:14

schwim
#! Die Hard
From: Interweb's #1 Devotee
Registered: 2012-10-11
Posts: 1,031
Website

Re: [SOLVED] Finding out what's starting a process or service

Heya gutterslob, I just wanted to update this to say that a helpful fellow over at the ubu forums led me to the startup location in /etc/xdg/autostart.  Commenting the execute command in the file did the trick.

Thanks for the links to the tools.  Very handy for me to see it in that format.

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