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#1 2014-02-18 05:08:59

Grapes
Member
Registered: 2013-11-13
Posts: 29

Being a poweruser

Hello,

I have been using Linux since about October of last year. I have always been a computer person and I can honestly say this is the best decision for computers I have ever made. With that being said, I have always been interested in knowing everything I can and hopefully becoming a master at computers. (Although I know there is literally too much information and new information is always being created. But you get the gist.)  Everything from coding, to software, to hardware, to hacking, so being what is called a poweruser. But to accomplish this I need some help if I may ask.

What are some good references of learning these things, and being able to run a Linux OS just simply by commands and being a poweruser?

Sorry for the long post, but I appreciate any replies smile

Last edited by Grapes (2014-02-18 05:12:30)

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#2 2014-02-18 05:37:32

frustratedtech
Member
From: /root
Registered: 2014-02-10
Posts: 23
Website

Re: Being a poweruser

Best thing to do is figure out what you want to do and make it work.

Example, setup a web server and email server.

You will find some things easy and others not. But all info you get as you search for fixes will be very helpful in other Linux adventures.

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#3 2014-02-18 06:37:54

Grapes
Member
Registered: 2013-11-13
Posts: 29

Re: Being a poweruser

frustratedtech wrote:

Best thing to do is figure out what you want to do and make it work.

Example, setup a web server and email server.

You will find some things easy and others not. But all info you get as you search for fixes will be very helpful in other Linux adventures.

Thank you for the reply. And that actually sounds nice, I will definitely try that!

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#4 2014-02-18 06:40:01

wuxmedia
wookiee madclaw
From: Back in Blighty
Registered: 2012-03-09
Posts: 1,445
Website

Re: Being a poweruser

Basically - use CLI for everything. lol

absolutely what frustratedtech said.

If you want a job doing what you want, then - obviously, get involved in that.
If it's for a hobby, try to do something thing unreasonable.
Distro hop, learn the similarities and differences of each distro (here I mean *main distros*, installing archbang isn't really installing arch) go from the ground up - netinstalls, mini.iso's  arch basic install, slackware basic install.

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#5 2014-02-18 08:05:23

KrunchTime
#! Die Hard
From: Not Where I Belong
Registered: 2012-03-02
Posts: 1,716

Re: Being a poweruser

Subscribe to one or more of the following magazines:

01) Linux Format; www.linuxformat.com
02) Linux Journal; www.linuxjournal.com
03) Linux Voice; www.linuxvoice.com
04) Linux User & Developer; http://www.linuxuser.co.uk/

Read, and use as a reference, the following books:

01) Debian Administrator's Handbook; http://debian-handbook.info
02) A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming;
http://www.informit.com/store/practical … 0133085044
http://www.amazon.com/Practical-Guide-C … rogramming

Follow news about Linux and Open Source Software:

www.lxer.com

And, last but not least, peruse the forums here.

Last edited by KrunchTime (2014-02-25 18:46:24)

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#6 2014-02-18 12:29:37

mynis01
#! Die Hard
From: 127.0.0.1
Registered: 2010-07-02
Posts: 1,939

Re: Being a poweruser

I learn a lot by using GNS3 and seting up virtual production networks. Build a machine with decent multithreading and around 32-64gb RAM and you can virtualize a whole data center, set up HPC clusters, simulate your virtual employees' traffic to a mail server and watch how installing a load balancer effects it.

What frustratedtech said is right, you can't get a bachelor's degree in "PC master user." If you're looking at pursuing a career that involves computers, I would first decide if you would rather be an admin or a developer, and then learn about how those two branch out into different fields. In the end, you have to dedicate yourself to specific fields to master them.

Last edited by mynis01 (2014-02-18 12:44:20)

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#7 2014-02-18 15:36:56

Grapes
Member
Registered: 2013-11-13
Posts: 29

Re: Being a poweruser

Thank you for all the suggestions. And I am actually a computer science major right now, currently a Sophomore in college. So I am learning all about java and digital design right now. I just want to know so much, so again thank you all for the suggestions smile

Last edited by Grapes (2014-02-19 23:50:05)

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#8 2014-02-18 17:07:30

ew
#! Die Hard
Registered: 2012-09-27
Posts: 1,975

Re: Being a poweruser

Then I guess Byobu Terminal is the best WM for you, and Ranger might be the best file-manager.


- Vacant account

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#9 2014-02-18 18:10:07

Unia
#! Octo-portal-pussy
From: The Netherlands
Registered: 2010-07-17
Posts: 3,684

Re: Being a poweruser

wuxmedia wrote:

If it's for a hobby, try to do something thing unreasonable.
Distro hop, learn the similarities and differences of each distro (here I mean *main distros*, installing archbang isn't really installing arch) go from the ground up - netinstalls, mini.iso's  arch basic install, slackware basic install.

^ This. I learned so much from that! Not only package managers, but also X and recently I also learned the differences between init systems are important when you go "deeper" into different distros.


If you can't sit by a cozy fire with your code in hand enjoying its simplicity and clarity, it needs more work. --Carlos Torres
Github

I am a #! forum moderator. Feel free to send me a PM with any question you have!

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#10 2014-02-18 22:26:48

mynis01
#! Die Hard
From: 127.0.0.1
Registered: 2010-07-02
Posts: 1,939

Re: Being a poweruser

Grapes wrote:

Thank you for all the suggestions. And I am actually a computer science major right now, currently a Sophomore. So I am learning all about java and digital design right now. I just want to know so much, so again thank you all for the suggestions smile

Have you ever tried using Gentoo? That will at least teach you a lot about compiling software in Linux. Once you master that, you could move onto LFS and build your own Linux distro if you really wanted.

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#11 2014-02-18 23:16:03

Unia
#! Octo-portal-pussy
From: The Netherlands
Registered: 2010-07-17
Posts: 3,684

Re: Being a poweruser

mynis01 wrote:
Grapes wrote:

Thank you for all the suggestions. And I am actually a computer science major right now, currently a Sophomore. So I am learning all about java and digital design right now. I just want to know so much, so again thank you all for the suggestions smile

Have you ever tried using Gentoo?

Don't try to run before you can walk big_smile I would start with a minimal install, then Arch and then Gentoo if you want to set out on this.


If you can't sit by a cozy fire with your code in hand enjoying its simplicity and clarity, it needs more work. --Carlos Torres
Github

I am a #! forum moderator. Feel free to send me a PM with any question you have!

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#12 2014-02-19 00:19:28

ew
#! Die Hard
Registered: 2012-09-27
Posts: 1,975

Re: Being a poweruser

Unia wrote:

Don't try to run before you can walk big_smile I would start with a minimal install, then Arch and then Gentoo if you want to set out on this.

Nah. I can`t see why Gentoo should be a problem for anyone, and the only challenge with Arch is to get familiar with pacman, aur, and of course, that Arch forces you to dig deep into systemd. Other than that, it`s just like any minimal install. Arch isn`t difficult. It`s only unnecessarily tedious. Having to do basic configurations manually, isn`t difficult. It`s only stupid tongue  wink


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#13 2014-02-19 12:57:07

Unia
#! Octo-portal-pussy
From: The Netherlands
Registered: 2010-07-17
Posts: 3,684

Re: Being a poweruser

I never said it is difficult. I say Arch first, because you learn one hell of a lot from doing all those "unnecessarily tedious" steps. wink


If you can't sit by a cozy fire with your code in hand enjoying its simplicity and clarity, it needs more work. --Carlos Torres
Github

I am a #! forum moderator. Feel free to send me a PM with any question you have!

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#14 2014-02-19 19:30:41

xero
#! Junkie
From: 0x000000
Registered: 2013-09-30
Posts: 293
Website

Re: Being a poweruser

programming---
speaking from personal experience, learning too many programming languages at once can be hazardous. it's easy to confuse yourself. i'm a long time php + javascript coder, and i still find myself switching the concatenation syntax. (var+var or var.var ?) learn the core, language agnostic, fundamentals first (variables, methods, classes... functional vs procedural langs... compiling vs run-time execution... etc). once you have a core understanding, pick a language that interests you. like "desktop" development? learn c/c++, java, python etc. like web? learn php, ruby, javascript, etc. after learning a few you'll notice *LOTS* of similarities. soon you can pick up a new language a lot faster.

os---
others have said it best above. distro hop! learning about a new os can be fun. but might i suggest running these as a virtual machine (virtualbox). this way you can have a number of virtual os' on the same machine. so if you mess one up, it's not a big deal.

hacking---
depends on your goals. if it's white hat/security there are lots of avenues of study: network, machine, physical, etc. for black hat/nefarious i suggest https://www.owasp.org/ so many topics, so little time.

learning is fun. just don't overwhelm yourself big_smile

Last edited by xero (2014-02-19 19:32:50)

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#15 2014-02-19 21:34:37

ew
#! Die Hard
Registered: 2012-09-27
Posts: 1,975

Re: Being a poweruser

Unia wrote:

I never said it is difficult. I say Arch first, because you learn one hell of a lot from doing all those "unnecessarily tedious" steps. wink

Sure you do. Just tried to tease you a little  wink  I myself are learning a lot from trying to build distros myself. Nobody will probably ever use them, but they are great learning experiences for me, as I`m forced to dig a bit deeper into things, and also has to do some scripting. Or at least modifications of scripts wink  But I actually have a few originals also. I`m getting there. Coding is very fun, but there is a big problem, the hours fly away, and when I look up from the screen, suddenly it`s 4 hours past bedtime  lol


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#16 2014-02-19 21:50:30

jeffreyC
#! Junkie
Registered: 2010-09-02
Posts: 420

Re: Being a poweruser

xero wrote:

hacking---
depends on your goals. if it's white hat/security there are lots of avenues of study: network, machine, physical, etc. for black hat/nefarious i suggest https://www.owasp.org/ so many topics, so little time.

And if you are white hat/security the black hat suggestion is also good
as Sun Tzu said:
"It is said that if you know your enemies and know yourself, you will not be imperiled in a hundred battles; if you do not know your enemies but do know yourself, you will win one and lose one; if you do not know your enemies nor yourself, you will be imperiled in every single battle."

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#17 2014-02-19 22:15:28

dot|not
#! Junkie
From: /dev/null
Registered: 2013-09-05
Posts: 278
Website

Re: Being a poweruser

If you want to learn something about information security start by getting to know your operating system. Intimately. Really. Intimately. You want to learn about networking. You want to learn about the ins and outs of the various protocols. You want to cuddle with the IP-stack, give HTTP more than just a short kiss on the cheek and spent more than one night with more exotic protocols. If you want to break things you need to know how they work. You will and want to need more knowledge than just "UDP is a stateless protocol operating on layer 4 of the OSI-model" (Is it really stateless? Maybe not so much.). You want to find repetitive tasks you do, like upgrading your operating system or backing up some data. You then want to take a programming language of choice and automate these things.

Many people are suggesting to start with easy topics when it comes to security. SQL injections are a common example. I'd strongly advise against that. You'd be better off learning how to prevent those things BEFORE learning how to do those things. And the most important rule when it comes to this topic is: Have fun. Enjoy what you are doing.


Slothkrew | Blog | Github | Zerobin | Crunchbang Ratio: 321.00
Acer C720 | Arch Linux | Openbox

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#18 2014-02-19 23:33:49

Grapes
Member
Registered: 2013-11-13
Posts: 29

Re: Being a poweruser

I wanted to say thank you to everyone for replying. It is so nice of you to put your effort into helping me, CrunchBang has a fantastic community. As for all of your suggestions I am going to probably give them all a try. I really want to learn so much about this stuff it excites me talking about it and I have always thought of developing my own Linux OS. So I am going to check out gentoo, how to make my own email servers, and all that fun stuff and move from there. This thread will always be a reference of what I should try to do next so thank you so much again everyone!

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#19 2014-02-22 13:58:17

CBizgreat!
#! Die Hard
Registered: 2011-07-27
Posts: 1,476

Re: Being a poweruser

#1. Just an opinion ... One good thing ya can do is learn by solving other peoples problems. Makes a person google their butt off and explore their own system @ the same time. Challenging/interesting ... like trying to solve a puzzle. Ya learn stuff + occasionally get positive feedback too. smile

#2. Find good references/resources ... Crunch forum is definitely one of them. You'll also come across nixers here ( and formerly here) that are obviously very knowledgeable + generous in sharing it w folks, guess can't hurt to pay attention to them and/or stalk their contribs. You'll definitely get a sense of who's worth paying attention to.

#3. Get outside of comfort-zone and push the envelope. Imo when comes to gnu/nix breaking things is good, so break things ... solve the problem and/or reinstall and keep breaking things until you understand it well enough that you can vast majority of the time resolve the issues w/o resorting to reinstall. ( or restoring a backup)

Why not ... if only life were like gnu/Linux, just reinstall and you have a fresh start. Plus if you aren't breaking stuff you aren't pushing da envelope very far man. Of course #! and Debian stable also have the added virtue that they're inherently harder to break. smile

Cuz as El_koraco has been known to say. "Everytime a gnu/nixer resorts to reinstalling their OS to sort out an issue ... Somewhere a kitten bursts into flames." O course a kitten doesn't actually burst into flames and reinstalling imo is a dang good approach for folks, esp initially, hiz sentiment imo definitely haz wisdom. tongue

Vll! smile

Last edited by CBizgreat! (2014-02-22 14:15:09)


Some common cbiz abbreviations. This will save me time and yet @ same time tell folks what the babble is supposed to mean.

Vll ! = ( Viva la gnu/Linux !)    Vl#!! = ( Viva la #! !)    Last but not least, UD ... OD ! = ( Use Debian ... or die !) tongue

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#20 2014-02-25 23:10:38

deepfnord
New Member
From: Chicago
Registered: 2014-02-13
Posts: 5

Re: Being a poweruser

dot|not wrote:

If you want to learn something about information security start by getting to know your operating system. Intimately. Really. Intimately. You want to learn about networking. You want to learn about the ins and outs of the various protocols. You want to cuddle with the IP-stack, give HTTP more than just a short kiss on the cheek and spent more than one night with more exotic protocols. If you want to break things you need to know how they work. You will and want to need more knowledge than just "UDP is a stateless protocol operating on layer 4 of the OSI-model" (Is it really stateless? Maybe not so much.). You want to find repetitive tasks you do, like upgrading your operating system or backing up some data. You then want to take a programming language of choice and automate these things.

Many people are suggesting to start with easy topics when it comes to security. SQL injections are a common example. I'd strongly advise against that. You'd be better off learning how to prevent those things BEFORE learning how to do those things. And the most important rule when it comes to this topic is: Have fun. Enjoy what you are doing.


This. This is what I want to do. I'm still very much an ignoramus but I'm trying to start from the ground up. I've contemplated taking formal courses, but it's a lot more fun and (IMO) a lot more educational to just screw around with things until they break and then fix them.


Don't Panic!

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#21 2014-02-26 03:29:32

linux4life88
#! Member
Registered: 2010-03-26
Posts: 90

Re: Being a poweruser

You could buy a raspberry pi, odroid-u3 or beaglebone black. They would give you experience using arm based Linux distributions and the uses for these things ends with your imagination. They also are cheap, really cheap for a desktop computer.

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#22 2014-02-26 06:01:52

twoion
#! CrunchBanger
From: 日本・関東
Registered: 2012-05-11
Posts: 163

Re: Being a poweruser

ew wrote:
Unia wrote:

Don't try to run before you can walk big_smile I would start with a minimal install, then Arch and then Gentoo if you want to set out on this.

Nah. I can`t see why Gentoo should be a problem for anyone

For people with hellishly slow netbooks as their primary computer, people like me.


Running Debian Sid & Experimental with Liquorix kernels and the Infinality libfreetype patches.

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