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#51 2013-05-10 11:19:10

DebianJoe
#! Code Whisperer
From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Day 15-Part 2...cli programs that serve no purpose at all!

Okay, so my last few posts have been a little heavy and not as much fun as they could have been, so I'll give you a 2nd post today for things that I think you might at least laugh at a bit.

One of the things that I see here in the Crunchbang forums more than anywhere else is "How to make ______ look good."  Well, if we're using a terminal for everything, we're limited to colors and fonts mostly.  So, what about having something to "customize" your non-graphical desktop?  Let's see about:

Cmatrix
2013_05_10_061448_1366x768_scrot.jpg
I'm Neo
This one is in the Debian repos, and it does....well....this.  That's it.  Now, you can use about 10 different switches on launch and use shift+the numbers 1-6 to change colors, but all it does is scroll Matrix-styled gibberish down the length of the terminal.

The homepage for the author (and his switchs and hotkeys) should be here.

Perhaps in the near future I'll add some more simply "fun" little programs in the midst of all of the heavy-handed utilities.  Until then, enjoy watching the numbers trickle down.

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#52 2013-05-11 06:22:26

DebianJoe
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From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Day 16: I'm busy, cut me some slack.

So, I need to be working on code right now, so I'm just going to leave you guys with a fun little bash script that draws pipes.  I have looked around and the best that I can come up with for an "original author" is "Someone from the Arch Linux forums."  If somebody finds the guy who penned the 'un-hacked-up' version of this script, I'd gladly credit them for the original algorithm.  This is just a different take on it.

#!/bin/bash
p=1
f=75 s=13 r=2000 t=0
w=$(tput cols) h=$(tput lines)
v=( [00]="\x83" [01]="\x8f" [03]="\x93"
    [10]="\x9b" [11]="\x81" [12]="\x93"
    [21]="\x97" [22]="\x83" [23]="\x9b"
    [30]="\x97" [32]="\x8f" [33]="\x81" )
RNDSTART=0
NOCOLOR=0

OPTIND=1
while getopts "p:f:s:r:RCh" arg; do
case $arg in
    p) ((p=(OPTARG>0)?OPTARG:p));;
    f) ((f=(OPTARG>19 && OPTARG<101)?OPTARG:f));;
    s) ((s=(OPTARG>4 && OPTARG<16 )?OPTARG:s));;
    r) ((r=(OPTARG>0)?OPTARG:r));;
    R) RNDSTART=1;;
    C) NOCOLOR=1;;
    h) echo -e "Usage: $(basename $0) [OPTION]..."
        echo -e "Animated pipes terminal screensaver.\n"
        echo -e " -p [1-]\tnumber of pipes (D=1)."
        echo -e " -f [20-100]\tframerate (D=75)."
        echo -e " -s [5-15]\tprobability of a straight fitting (D=13)."
        echo -e " -r LIMIT\treset after x characters (D=2000)."
        echo -e " -R \t\trandom starting point."
        echo -e " -C \t\tno color."
        echo -e " -h\t\thelp (this screen).\n"
        exit 0;;
    esac
done

for (( i=1; i<=p; i++ )); do
    c[i]=$((i%8)) n[i]=0 l[i]=0
    ((x[i]=RNDSTART==1?RANDOM*w/32768:w/2))
    ((y[i]=RNDSTART==1?RANDOM*h/32768:h/2))
done

tput smcup
tput reset
tput civis
while ! read -t0.0$((1000/f)) -n1; do
    for (( i=1; i<=p; i++ )); do
        # New position:
        ((${l[i]}%2)) && ((x[i]+=(${l[i]}==1)?1:-1))
        ((!(${l[i]}%2))) && ((y[i]+=(${l[i]}==2)?1:-1))

        # Loop on edges (change color on loop):
        ((c[i]=(${x[i]}>w || ${x[i]}<0 || ${y[i]}>h || ${y[i]}<0)?RANDOM%8:${c[i]}))
        ((x[i]=(${x[i]}>w)?0:((${x[i]}<0)?w:${x[i]})))
        ((y[i]=(${y[i]}>h)?0:((${y[i]}<0)?h:${y[i]})))

        # New random direction:
        ((n[i]=RANDOM%s-1))
        ((n[i]=(${n[i]}>1||${n[i]}==0)?${l[i]}:${l[i]}+${n[i]}))
        ((n[i]=(${n[i]}<0)?3:${n[i]}%4))

        # Print:
        tput cup ${y[i]} ${x[i]}
        [[ $NOCOLOR == 0 ]] && echo -ne "\033[1;3${c[i]}m"
        echo -ne "\xe2\x94${v[${l[i]}${n[i]}]}"
        l[i]=${n[i]}
    done
    ((t*p>=r)) && tput reset && tput civis && t=0 || ((t++))
done
tput rmcup

Save it, make it executable, run it....enjoy. big_smile  If you get "colored questionmarks" instead of pipes, then your terminal emulator doesn't support the character set.  Try something like urxvt. wink

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#53 2013-05-12 06:20:24

DebianJoe
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From: The Bleeding Edge
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Day 17: A New Project

You guys may have to give me a little while, but I love Rogue.  In the discussion about ncurses-based cli gaming, I realized that you can never have enough rogue-like games.  So, for the next little while, I'm going to spend some time working on a Python2-based real time Rogue-clone.  Someone else should do some reviews until I get done with this.

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#54 2013-05-12 12:20:54

wuxmedia
wookiee madclaw
From: Back in Blighty
Registered: 2012-03-09
Posts: 1,472
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Whilst we're on the p2p thing, I use mldonkey. Handles .torrent (no magnets, as yet,  but that can be circumvented) and ed2k (old skool) and others.
Runs without cli, but uses a webgui.
Or telnet to get configured and to add files.
Not much a review... smile

Omg rogue! That took me back, quaff etc
Prob with ninvaders is it doesn't fire and move, found it quite fun. I preferered. tetris though

Last edited by wuxmedia (2013-05-12 12:24:45)

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#55 2013-05-12 13:05:24

DebianJoe
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

@wux, so far I have an "@" symbol tied to keybinds and a random map generator done, but no baddies, inventory, shops, story, etc.  That was after around 250 lines of coding since I started last night.  It may take longer to get done that I would have thought.  Hopefully, though, it'll bring back the nostalgia and still be fun.

More to come. wink

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#56 2013-05-12 16:22:15

slartie
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From: Denmark
Registered: 2013-05-06
Posts: 53
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

And while you wait for DebianJoe to get his first version done, be sure to check out: http://roguebasin.roguelikedevelopment.org for all your roguelike needs smile

It's all I ever play these days. That and work on my own roguelike.

If you're a console cowboy, roguelikes are a great way to kick back for a while without leaving the beloved terminal.

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#57 2013-05-12 17:17:45

DebianJoe
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Thanks for the link Slartie!  Those libs are WAY cleaner than how I'd started off, so I may throw the "#####" walls that I was using (doing it with straight text) and use the ones linked in their tutorial.

I'm still for a group project in the future, by the way, so if there are other old-school titles to be remade with a twist...count me in (unless you use Java.)  I started a git for just the purpose of little, pointless things that I hack out in my spare time, so I'm game to add to that.

EDIT: We need something like a "Coder's Corner" for these little tips.  They're not really tips/tricks/scripts, but for those of us who really enjoy coding to share ideas outside of github.

Last edited by DebianJoe (2013-05-12 17:50:41)

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#58 2013-05-12 19:23:25

slartie
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From: Denmark
Registered: 2013-05-06
Posts: 53
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

@DebianJoe - I'm guessing you're referring to libtcod. Yes, it's probably the best one out there. It's packed with goodies for several programming languages, including my favorite: C. Enjoy.

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#59 2013-05-12 19:37:57

DebianJoe
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

slartie wrote:

...my favorite: C.

You're a good man for liking C.  C is the language of the the Norse gods. big_smile  Yes, libtcod seems packed with goodies that I want to play with.  I may scan through some of the above provided link for ideas too.

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#60 2013-05-12 22:00:14

Unia
#! Octo-portal-pussy
From: The Netherlands
Registered: 2010-07-17
Posts: 4,058

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

DebianJoe wrote:

C is the language of the the Norse gods. big_smile

Have I missed something?


If you can't sit by a cozy fire with your code in hand enjoying its simplicity and clarity, it needs more work. --Carlos Torres
Github

I am a #! forum moderator. Feel free to send me a PM with any question you have!

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#61 2013-05-13 04:36:33

DebianJoe
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Unia wrote:

Have I missed something?

Perhaps.  I've recently been really trying to sharpen up my C, as I was a student in the 90's, and back then, everyone was pushed to learn C++ under the assumption that it was going to totally replace C.  Well, that ended up with me learning a great many of the C++ concepts and growing to really rely on the extra classes.

Then, I really started to look at C from a new light recently.  Everything that I've ever done in C++ can technically be done in C, and when you're done...the code makes more sense.  I can't remember where I heard the quote, "One of my most productive days was one where I threw away 10,000 lines of code," but that's how I've felt going back to the old-school C.  I've already decided that after I get done with the university classes that I'm currently in, I'm going to go back to C and see if I can't REALLY get into using it.  I want to know C like Torvalds knows C.  tongue

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#62 2013-05-13 06:27:38

DebianJoe
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Day 17:  What did I do last?  Emacs --ediff

I don't want this thread to totally fall by the wayside just because I get off on a tangent where I try to recreate (or add some spin) to 1980's technology just to scratch an itch, so let's take a few moments to look at some of the tools that I actually use when working on something. 

I have heard it said recently, "DebianJoe will lead you down the heretic path of emacs."  That cracked me up, so let's continue to follow the path of the Dark Side and use a minor mode to do something that can save you TONS of time when working on a project.  I'd assume that if you're making very elaborate configurations, the same tools would be useful.

So, for step 1: Make Backups of what actually worked before you started hacking on your project.  I don't really care how you go about doing this as long as you have some way to differentiate between what you had that functions, and what you want to do.  After we've made our changes and go to execute our new program, assume that it is BROKEN ("Oh no, this shouldn't happen....I'm an amazing programmer and should never make mistakes!" [sarcasm intended]).  Luckily, we made a backup of what worked last, so in a worse-case scenario, we could do a fallback to the last working variation.  On the other hand, we really wanted to make the changes that we were working on, so let's figure out what we did wrong.

Assume for the sake of discussion that our program is large enough that we cannot simply glance through it and see everything that we've done.  It makes it even more difficult if we had to scan through multiple lines of code, making tiny changes to lines scattered throughout the monolith of poorly designed and sparsely commented (because we're amazing programmers and don't decide to comment until we forget what we were even working on and have to figure it all back out again) code that we've been working on.  Now, if only we could see JUST the changes we'd made since the last backup, then it would make figuring out what we did wrong so much better.

2013_05_13_003441_1366x768_scrot.jpg
ediff - highlighting differences since....a long time ago

By invoking the "M^x" keybind, we are presented with the same prompt in the minibuffer that we used to bring up wanderlust.  This time, let's look at how to launch "ediff" to help us spot the changes we've made.  By using "M^x 'ediff', we launch ediff with no arguments, and it prompts us for "File A" which is either the backup or the new file.  After we press <RETURN> it prompts us for "FileB" which will be whichever one we didn't use for FileA.  (If that sentence confuses you, it's my fault for being a poor writer: put the backup as "File A" and the newly hacked file as "File B" or the other way around, as long as they're not the same file, this works.)

Now, ediff will take off as shown in the screenshot and put highlighted bars around the changes that you've made.  By default, ediff spawns a new frame to display its information.  Assuming that you want to use the same frame, or force it to stack the compared panels horizontally (because you bought a totally sweet 16:9 laptop because you like watching movies on it more than coding...and you didn't know that 4:3 is superior in every possible way.) then there are some really cool configs and scripts at The emacs wiki that will help you change the way that it functions.

Also, ediff has a few (a LOT) of different arguments that it can be launched with to allow it to compare a file against the buffer itself/a numerical backup/two other files/etc.  For all of the possible options, check the GNUemacs page.  There's also a list of the keybinds for working with ediff, and you WILL want those.  The ability to scroll two or more different files, side-by-side, at the same time, highlighting any differences, ignoring whitespace....well, it's essential to being able to quickly identify where you might have called a class as "sfel" instead of "self" (once again, not that this would ever happen to me, because I don't ever mistype....why won't you believe me?")

Now, back to trying to make old-school games...perfectly...without having to make any changes....or typos....or totally broken functions....(I'm starting to wonder if I could be more accurate wearing a set of over-mitts while typing.)

Enjoy Troubleshooting your Scripting. big_smile

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#63 2013-05-13 15:37:56

slartie
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From: Denmark
Registered: 2013-05-06
Posts: 53
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Now that you've been talking about coding a bunch, it would only seem natural to mention valgrind, and of course the mighty gdb. Might as well not diff code that's leaking and dumping cores wink

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#64 2013-05-13 16:34:19

DebianJoe
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

@slartie

So very true.  Memory management is a huge part (especially when using languages that allow more "direct" access to memory modules) of programming.  You guys are more than welcome to write something up, as well...you don't have to rely on me to do all of the gabbing. wink  Somewhere down the line, I guess I have to cover "GNUmake" as well, don't I?

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#65 2013-05-13 17:09:07

slartie
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From: Denmark
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Posts: 53
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

make, autotools, git, bzr ... You have your work cut out for you. smile

I'll see about doing a bit on some console'y stuff sooner rather than later. Maybe give folks a little taste of zsh or something.

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#66 2013-05-13 23:10:21

thorbs
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Registered: 2013-04-22
Posts: 53

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

So I basically wear a tie, and love mindmapping software. I was waiting for the xmind review but it never actually materialized did it? Anyways, if you are ever up to finishing the mindmap review you should include Labyrinth, which in my opinion is the best mindmapping software, but you have to install the latest beta(not in the Debian repositories) to get something that works. To the why of mindmappingsoftware, it lies in the fact that one does not loose a mindmap file as easily as a napkin and it is easier to change the order of things after the initial output. Btw. I dont really think your entirely fair to the tiewearing consultant crowd as some of us do love superheroes and even dabble in #! in our sparetime.

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#67 2013-05-14 05:16:53

DebianJoe
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

@ Thorbs, you have to take pretty much anything that I say with a HUGE grain of salt.  I try to make things interesting to read by making jokes.  When you're heading down the path of eventually explaining null termination and address allocation, it takes a certain degree of humor to make those subjects interesting.  I also make big mistakes in coding, often breaking things in horrific fashions, so don't take that part of my writing seriously either.

Consider the Dilbert comics that everyone has stuck in an office somewhere as a prime example: we have to laugh at ourselves a bit or we'd all go crazy.  No serious offense is meant to the management and consultant crowd.

As far as an X-mind review, I am sure that I can get it to run, but I won't be able to give the process of use a fair shot because it's not something that I personally would use.  Feel free to write one up if you have time, and if I can get everyone else really giving free software a good inspection, then I'd be extremely excited.  Between work/kids/schooling/family/development...it's really difficult for me to be able to do much more than I'm currently getting done.  It's like the Debian project: it's not just one man behind it.  If everyone would really drop in their knowledge on a particular subject that they know well, the entire community could benefit.

Rock on my superhero-loving, tie-wearing, mind-mapping, bro!

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#68 2013-05-14 09:38:06

thorbs
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Registered: 2013-04-22
Posts: 53

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Ah, I also understood everything as good fun, and was being humoristic about my own profession, that you needle very skillfully. Made me laugh

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#69 2013-05-14 16:19:05

DebianJoe
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Day 18: What...no GNU/Linux to Work With?

Man, I've been out of place for the little while, and am being forced by the worst IT department known to man (these guys have somehow managed to not figure out Win Server 2003 yet...in the last 10 years) to use a M$ computer.  Luckily, it's Win7 and not some touchscreen monstrosity, and I can at least manage to come up with ways to cope.

So, what to do?  Well, I thought I'd throw out a few potential solutions to get your GNU/Linux fix when you are using a loaner that doesn't have your OS of choice on it.

cygwin.jpg
Cygwin....Linux shell-ish in Windoze

Essentially, Cygwin is a terminal that allows some Linux-like behavior within Windoze environments.  It's basically just a DLL (cygwin1.dll) which acts as a Linux API layer providing Linux API functionality.  If nothing else, you can bash-script a bit while in a corporate environment where they feel like giving a developer freedom might result in them accomplishing something.  I've also been offered MS Visual Studio to work with...in which I simply broke out a flash drive with Notepad++ on it, and politely declined.

Mentioning USB, there's always the option to boot up a nice little persistent USB Linux distro.
icewm1.jpg
Like Puppy Linux with IceWM.

It's not perfect, but it's a way to make yourself a nice little portable toolkit that you can make look and feel like you'd like it.  This is probably the most "pure" answer that I can come up with, but the problem here is that Puppy is designed OOTB to do very little in the world of programming.  That's what I'm supposed to be doing (not writing about what I'm doing to get around the fact that I don't want to clicky-clicky the "Start Button"), so I need something that really feels like home.

So....how...about Crunchbang.
vmplayer.jpg
Now, we're talking.

By exporting your VM of a system you actually like using as an appliance, on any system that allows virtualization, you can have a (not so very small) preconfigured OS that fits your every whim.  You can carry around your configs, your applications, your system...the way that you want it to work.  Now, this does require some more serious processing power (and RAM, VM's love RAM), but it's a very nice way to bring your home with you wherever you go.  Also, minimalism carries over very well to virtual machines.  I'm sure that if I liked Noobuntu with Unity and a million animated widgets, this might not work out as well, but something like Crunchbang is a good option.  The other huge upside to this entire ideology, is that while you're working and the knuckle dragging IT guys stop by, they'll possibly ask "Whar is u'r Start-Button" and you can educate them on the wonders of environments outside of Windows while owning your workspace.  If you're really good, you can drop the words "free" and "cost-less" and "highly productive" in front of their manager while you make them look like fools for dishing out money to license software that you don't need to do your work.

And that, is how I do my part to spread the love. 

I realize that this post wasn't highly informative, but I thought that with our discussions about being minimalistic, we could at least look at some situations where it leads to more flexibility, even on newer hardware....now I need to get back to work.

EDIT: As Thorbs has pointed out, I am not always fair to other groups working in technology when writing.  I certainly don't mean to insult sysadmins, as they're sometimes the most impressive guys/gals you'll meet.  Some of them are highly talented and very knowledgeable...but this particular group I'm stuck with isn't in that category.

Last edited by DebianJoe (2013-05-14 16:24:20)

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#70 2013-05-15 21:09:25

DebianJoe
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From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Day 19: The Path to Valhalla (Valgrind)

I'm back home, sitting around in some old sweatpants that I wouldn't be caught dead in outside of the house because they have holes all in them from years of abuse and a "Do You Even Lift" XXL t-shirt from Iron Sport Gym, so life's good.  Since we'd been discussing reaching the Hall of Warriors through programming, it only makes sense to look at a fantastic analyzing tool for our programming.

valgrind.jpg
Valgrind in Action

This may be one of the best programs I've ever written, but before we go to run this beast of a highly-functional new mega-awesome application (ironically titled "badbadbad.c", which probably won't sell too many copies), we should perhaps use Valgrind to check it for errors.

Oh, look, I made some mistakes.  I can't believe it!  If you look closely at the output from running Valgrind against my recently compiled code, it tells me that I made not 1...but 2 mistakes.  (Even though it only counts it as 1 error.)  So, what exactly is taking place here?

Well, I've managed both a heap-block overrun and a memory leak in only 13 lines of code.  Valgrind was designed for the purpose of pointing this out to me before I attempt to execute my newly designed program.  It does this by firing up what is in all honesty a very small virtual machine, and running Memcheck to wrap small pieces of code around your flying memory to track it.  This is a huge simplification of what's really going on, but if this seems like a foreign construct it may help to think of it as people catching sharks to put tags on them so that we can watch their feeding habits and evacuate a beach before people start running out of the water screaming about how a shark just ate their uncle.

Valgrind comes with Massif, a heap profiler, Helgrind and DRD, tools capable of detecting race conditions in multithreaded code, Cachegrind, a cache profiler and its GUI KCacheGrind.  Callgrind, an extension to Cachegrind, which produces more information about callgraphs, KCacheGrind is capable of visualizing output from Callgrind as well as Cachegrind, exp-sgcheck, an experimental tool to find stack and global array overrun errors which Memcheck cannot find, exp-dhat, dynamic heap analysis tool which analyzes how much memory is allocated and for how long as well as patterns of memory usage, and exp-bbv, a performance simulator that extrapolates performance from a small sample set.  (This is the worst formatting I've ever done on a paragraph.  I'm prone to run-on sentences, but this one is pretty epic.)

For more information on what the thousands of little things actually mean when you run Valgrind, go to Valgrind.org and read up.  There's a lot of good reading there that can drastically cut down on your debugging and troubleshooting time.  Assuming that you're a big fan of GUI implementations, there's also Valkyrie, which is included in the Debian repos.  It's essentially a bloat-ware version of Valgrind, so if you use it, it might be best to just not mention that to me.  I'll go off on a rampage where I complain about coders who prefer clicking over typing are the reasons that WYSIWYGs ever came to happen and that they're the reason that people are afraid of reading, and possibly also the reason the Jersey Shore was ever actually aired, and the very potential cause for the future apocolypse.

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#71 2013-05-16 20:23:03

DebianJoe
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From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Day 20: "Now I'm Lost...in Oblivion...."
*sung like the guys from Mastodon

Well, frustration with Gentoo + a total dislike for Xorg and the fact that I'm insane about minimalism, I'm about to "Roast my Own" the old-school way.  I've wiped Jarvis's partition table, destroying both #! Waldorf and Gentoo, and am going to go all 1980's by tracking Sid without X at all.  I'm not 100% sure, but I think I can still get a wonderful screencap with "fbgrab fb.png <screen_today>.png" or something along those lines.  I may actually learn something from this, and if I do, I'll be sure to share the wealth with everyone here.  Beyond that, it'll give me a chance to try to see what it used to be like before the shiny widgets got in the way of being able to really dig down into the system and tweak it.

More to come, hopefully.

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#72 2013-05-17 05:40:15

DebianJoe
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From: The Bleeding Edge
Registered: 2013-03-13
Posts: 1,207
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Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

Day 20 pt. 2 --choices

So, I've got a prompt up and so far have tmux, emacs, mouse support with GPM, and that's all.  I tried out dvtm, but have gotten so used to tmux now that I can hotkey all of the same functionality in it and feel like I have better control of what's going on.  It did suck copying my entire tmux.conf by nano, but this wasn't about being efficient so much as being truly minimal.

So, now that I've taken the past few weeks to really try out some cli-based programs, I've got a fair idea of what I want on my Sid minimal box.

IRC- irssi
music -moc (sorry Ivan, but I still prefer it for my own use)
e-mail - Mutt
sound...ALSA probably
text editing - emacs
file management - dired & mc
web browser - w3m + elinks
window manager - tmux
network management - ceni
Rss - newsbeuter (I love this thing now)
torrenting - rtorrent
dict, in case I need to spell something
Calculator (uhm, well, I guess I should have one...) - Python Shell
Word-processor - Wordgrinder
archival- atool

What all am I missing?

Last edited by DebianJoe (2013-05-17 05:40:34)

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#73 2013-05-17 06:08:22

slartie
#! Member
From: Denmark
Registered: 2013-05-06
Posts: 53
Website

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

From the looks of it, you're pretty much good to go.

If you're into social media, for twitter you could use twitter-mode in emacs if that one still works, or the python based Turses. I use the last one, and it works fairly well.

spreadsheet - sc ?
game - Dungeon Crawl Stone Soup
shell - zsh
messenger - finch

edit: and of course gnus for all your USENET needs. Or you could use slrn if you're more into the mutt look.

I'd like to see how you get on with the framebuffer. Be sure to let us know if you manage to get image viewing running properly - inside the browser as well. I haven't had much luck with it myself, otherwise I'd be living in the framebuffer now smile

command line PDF viewing: (muy importante IMHO) - http://linuxers.org/howto/how-open-pdf- … pdf-viewer

Last edited by slartie (2013-05-17 06:18:27)

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#74 2013-05-17 11:57:01

xaos52
The Good Doctor
From: Planet of the @s
Registered: 2011-06-24
Posts: 4,602

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

@DJ - Why irssi when you have emacs running... and thus erc is only a command away?

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Be excellent to each other!

#75 2013-05-17 13:41:08

ivanovnegro
Ivan #000000
From: unstable madness
Registered: 2011-06-02
Posts: 5,429

Re: Joe's repo grab-bag (testing like it's 1999)

You want mplayer/mplayer2 for movies, don't you? big_smile

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