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#1 2013-02-16 00:13:14

cism
Member
From: Seattle
Registered: 2013-02-14
Posts: 18

Yep.

Greetings. I am new-ish to Linux, and I am slowly porting over my whole computing world to it. I was let go from an Exchange Engineering position at Microsoft last year, and have since gone on unemployment and convinced the benefits department to continue cutting me a check while I go back for a degree in my chosen profession. I fell completely out of love with the IT world these past few years and recently discovered a new-found interest as I explore Linux.

I spent some time with dual-booting my Windows 7 VAIO VPCEJ with ustudio/kxstudio (am a wanna-be audio hobbyist), but since I am in school for a Network Admin degree I wanted something more task-oriented and simple that I could eventually learn to configure for my hobbyist desires. So now I am dual-booting with #! instead, and notified my 'Linux-essentials' instructor that I'd stray from his CentOS/Mint approach and follow along in this environment, instead; he seemed very intrigued.

So far, am digging this distro and for now I am going to try using it to expand my Linux and computing knowledge. Cheers.


-[cism]

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#2 2013-02-16 00:16:38

dura
Bloated Gimp
From: interzone
Registered: 2012-09-15
Posts: 2,106

Re: Yep.

You may not have noticed, but Linux is actually part of the "IT world" as well.

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#3 2013-02-16 01:13:21

rkwurth
#! Junkie
Registered: 2012-09-04
Posts: 365

Re: Yep.

"I fell completely out of love with the IT world these past few years and recently discovered a new-found interest (IN THE IT WORLD) as I explore Linux."

It's okay to misunderstand.

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#4 2013-02-16 03:38:02

txbahai
#! CrunchBanger
Registered: 2013-02-05
Posts: 175

Re: Yep.

Welcome!


Kindest Regards,
Tim A

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#5 2013-02-16 05:08:36

VastOne
#! Ranger
From: #! Fringe Division
Registered: 2011-04-26
Posts: 10,163
Website

Re: Yep.

Welcome to CrunchBang and the Community cism, we are glad to have you!


VSIDO | SolusOS

Words That Build Or Destroy

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#6 2013-02-16 10:32:04

fatmac
#! Die Hard
Registered: 2012-11-14
Posts: 1,948

Re: Yep.

Welcome aboard cism.

You might find this thread of interest :-
http://crunchbang.org/forums/viewtopic.php?id=23168

('apt-cache search audio' might find you some programs)


Linux since 1999
Currently:  AntiX, & Crunchbang.
A good general beginners book for Linux :- http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz
A good Debian read :- http://debian-handbook.info/get/now/

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#7 2013-02-16 12:17:06

intoCB
Scatweasel
Registered: 2012-10-25
Posts: 1,852

Re: Yep.

Welcome, cism,

Yeah, beneath all Corenominal's hard work, it's the same Debian used on servers the world over.

If you are interested in a Red Hat (Fedora) based distro that implements a similar concept, there is Viperr http://darthwound.org/viperren.html.

It's not quite as polished as #! and somewhat unusually the postinstall script includes the possibility of downloading pictures of models and holywood/adult film stars but hey it's a Crunch-esque Fedora if that appeals to you.

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#8 2013-02-16 20:28:29

cism
Member
From: Seattle
Registered: 2013-02-14
Posts: 18

Re: Yep.

Thanks, all. @fatmac: Excellent, thank you. @intoCB: I think while I am still sort of green, I'll forgo getting involved in Fedora. Perhaps once I know my way around a system comfortably, and maybe when I've come as far as to have actual projects to work on for myself which would warrant a deeper inspection.

I am sort of feeling the need to stick with one distro for a bit, and after kxstudio bored me (and took a huge shit - good thing I am a backup fiend), I felt the need to get some "big-boy-pants". After 'shopping' for almost three weeks, looking at all the variety and overwhelming options, this one caught my eye as being a great start. Anyway, I hope to learn about Linux in general using this platform, regardless of the overwhelming opinion that this distribution is usually enjoyed by more veteran users. I always learn best by walking directly into the fire.

Learning how to program (finally) is near the top of my learning list; another project upcoming is setting up a small home studio for recording and such. I have one which worked with my Win7 environment, but proprietary/incompatible hardware interfaces will need to be replaced to get the most from the new OS/setup. I consider it a great excuse to upgrade, anyways.

When I am not studenting, musicking, or staring off into space, I am parenting my 3-month old son most days, along with my 6 year old daughter on weekends. Woot!

Last edited by cism (2013-02-16 20:30:20)


-[cism]

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#9 2013-02-19 01:40:50

cism
Member
From: Seattle
Registered: 2013-02-14
Posts: 18

Re: Yep.

I just reinstalled. I was messing around with a potential Line6 driver install (which may or may not work for an external USB Line6 device I am hoping to someday make work in linux). I must have hosed something because later upon reboot, the OS came up as per usual except that it appeared as if the two desktops weren't enabled; Conky showed what it usually does, and even though I could see the clock ticking off the seconds, no keys whatsoever, nor mouse-pointer (either with touchpad or USB mouse) would respond. None of the shortcuts. Nothing. Since I didn't have anything really invested in that install, and have no idea yet how to start troubleshooting such instances when they occur (in Linux, anyhow), here I am at square one. haha. Just thought it would be fun to share.

The issue occured after I went willy-nilly trying to get this to install. They didn't have the Debian-specific installation instructions, although the tarball included a folder called Debian which had a nifty config file called Rules (I could only assume that the locations given in the instructions for install on this person's site were absolutely different in this distro). After receiving that pesky error 2 when the installation couldn't locate /lib/modules/... I created /modules and in the second attempt a make install received a similar, although different, error. I was following along a few of the forum threads dealing with similar issues, and had planned to come back to it when my boot-up froze.
Lesson learned:


learn more lessons.

http://www.tanzband-scream.at/line6/


-[cism]

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#10 2013-02-25 22:10:13

cism
Member
From: Seattle
Registered: 2013-02-14
Posts: 18

Re: Yep.

#! now owns my entire hard disk. Windows 7 can have a VM if it wants. I might check out an Arch vm for learningz-sake, or any other tidbit I want to peek at. Also, going to mod the crap laptop my 6-year old daughter uses to watch Netflix movies on to run DouDou and maybe Windows VM on that as well for her Netflix needs. Thanks for the posts/suggestions.

Now, to find some fun projects for myself to learn with..


-[cism]

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#11 2013-02-26 11:26:12

fatmac
#! Die Hard
Registered: 2012-11-14
Posts: 1,948

Re: Yep.

Just a suggestion if you have the need to re-install again, create a seperate /home partition, if you haven't already, it will safeguard your files.


Linux since 1999
Currently:  AntiX, & Crunchbang.
A good general beginners book for Linux :- http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz
A good Debian read :- http://debian-handbook.info/get/now/

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#12 2013-02-26 12:13:32

orionthehunter
#! Constellation
From: Japan
Registered: 2011-04-09
Posts: 899
Website

Re: Yep.

Welcome cism!

Learning to program can be fun, it can also be daunting.  Understanding the basics like variables, functions, logic, if/else conditionals, and loops is a really good thing to know and is more or less translatable across all the different languages (once you learn the syntax).  Before you go too deep into any one language, think hard about it.  It can take a lot of time to become fully accustomed to a certain language, and they all have their merits and demerits.

Good luck!

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#13 2013-02-27 06:42:57

cism
Member
From: Seattle
Registered: 2013-02-14
Posts: 18

Re: Yep.

*Damn...another really long post. If you don't really want to get to know me just yet from reading drivel, the first paragraph should do*


I actually had /home (have all my main directories in the suggested Guided Partioning). I just didn't have anything in my last /home worth saving, really, as all my school work and personal docs are kept in other places anyway. Also, I'll admit to not yet having the second-nature, proper response to such scenarios, i.e.: Backing up the /home directory to these other locations I mentioned. I'll def do this going forward.

As for languages, I'll stick with whatever I learn during the course of my degree program firstly, before I delve in further. I imagine they'll introduce me to all the necessities of network administration functionality, which I am familiar with in Windows environs. Beyond bash, am interested in Perl (good for networking), Python (good bcuz everyone is talking about it?), and some C (enough to understand when people are discussing topics in C). I do my homework late-nights at Metrix Create Space www.metrixcreatespace.com and there's always helpful nerds here ten thousand times smarter than I am to ask questions of!

I guess a little background here could be warranted? Ignore if not. smile
I had a passing love of PCs (laptops, especially) since my stepdad brought one home from Boeing in 1995. Before long, even this amazing engineer had his teenage stepson troubleshooting little things here and there for him. Before long, I was reading about computers and buying parts, etc.
This is around the time I started dating, smoking weed and joined a band - so I wasn't as *fortunate* as some wonderful geek-types in that I went and did the "cool-kid" bit for a long while, and barely learning what I needed to get tech jobs in support. I never strove to truly understand computer science as my brain would shut down the more complex a subject matter became without someone to guide me through processes personally...which is how i learn best. Also, I think the boozing of all those years was a genuine hindrance on my ability to absorb or make use of knowledge...I quit drinking a year ago next month, and notice a huge difference.

I've charmed or shmoozed or leanred my way up the tech responsibility ladder only enough to get a decent paying job, which isn't that hard for someone with even a modicum of cleverness in them... I'm not certified in anything (although I'd like to be) but wouldn't know even where to start.

I've worked for Speakeasy.net for a few years, troubleshooting and supporting DSL at first, then eventually T1, bonded T1 (MPLS), Metro-Ethernet-Over-Copper (pretty much the same), VoIP, etc. all from the back end. Lovely environment! I learned a lot; router and device configs, TFTP xfers, generally troubleshooting from logs/IP info, customer service, how to be punk rock and still try and stay smart.

Also worked as an assistant for an IT guy on Bainbridge, running his own op, supporting a couple handfuls of local NW small/med sized businesses using Kaseya/Doyenz/ShadowProtect/AutoTask and other nifty things - learned a lot from him as a mentor, but still I had no book knowledge and could not easily pass a CompTIA exam I imagine. Mostly just looked things up and used logs and common sense/trial and error.

A year later, my best friend (we had worked at Speakeasy together for two years) got me interviewed for an tier 3 M$ Exchange support gig with Microsoft, fixing the email issues of the top fortune 500, 24x7. I did graves for them for over a year, begging to be let onto a more realistic shift. The money was great, more than I'd ever earned by far. Brushed up on some stuff, but didn't know much beyond Small Biz Server and Exch2003.....they wanted me to know a bit about 2007/2010. Big difference.
I charmed and bullsh@t my way successfully through interview, and the shear fact I knew what event logs were, how to sort-of work out IP subnet sitch on a marker-board, and a tiny blurb about how .edb files worked, they gave me a shot. Learned a lot in this job about helping manage a completely hopeless, gargantuan and impossibly un-scale-able Enterprise messaging network (datacenters/servers around the world, complexity at its greatest folly in the management-of) from a-holes who felt I had no place at M$ with my tattooed face and large lobes, etc. I only marginally was able to get anyone to truly show me anything but learned some Powershell cmdlets and how to locate and modify some scripts - that's where any programming I know ends.

I lasted a year, barely, and got unemployment because they couldn't devise a decent reason for letting me go of the contract. (to be fair, I flunked the Exchange 70-662 exam, but I mean that thing is just fucking horrendous).
.
Unemployment heard me out when I begged to be paid to go back and fill in the blanks of my IT knowledge traditionally - otherwise I'd never get another high-paying engineering job. They agreed *whew* so now I am trying to learn about computing from a more traditional tack. What's more, I am only now taking algebra for the first time in my life...after twenty years of zero arithmetic.

I really dig this crew and appreciate what I've seen in these forums as being generally more lenient and supportive to newcomers than many other forums out there.  /rant.


-[cism]

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#14 2013-02-27 06:59:21

orionthehunter
#! Constellation
From: Japan
Registered: 2011-04-09
Posts: 899
Website

Re: Yep.

Cool!  Nice history.  Sounds promising.  Best wishes and yes, this is a great crowd to learn from.  Ignore the occasional jerk, they pop up for some reason, but tend to fade away after some time.  Mostly only the really kind people that like listening to peoples problems and help fix them stick around for the long haul.

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#15 2013-02-27 07:21:24

junkie
#! Junkie
Registered: 2012-05-04
Posts: 364

Re: Yep.

Welcome cism! This is a great place to be. Make sure to share your music production journey as you progress.

cism wrote:

Metrix Create Space www.metrixcreatespace.com

Cool!

cism wrote:

...I quit drinking a year ago next month, and notice a huge difference.

No! Okay, dammit your right.

cism wrote:

how to be punk rock and still try and stay smart

Linux, is Punk Rock.

Also, might I add the big LQ http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/ as it is a wealth of data.

Last edited by junkie (2013-02-27 07:30:41)

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#16 2013-02-27 18:15:14

cism
Member
From: Seattle
Registered: 2013-02-14
Posts: 18

Re: Yep.

Sweeeeet


-[cism]

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#17 2013-02-27 18:22:19

pvsage
Internal Affairs
From: North Carolina
Registered: 2009-10-18
Posts: 11,443

Re: Yep.

Linux == Punk Rock
Windows == mainstream Top 40
Macintosh == Beat poetry


Yes; as a matter of fact, I am a cop.  Why do you ask? cool
I'm a moderator here.  How are we doing?  Feedback is encouraged.

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#18 2013-02-27 19:58:31

Jesusxfan
#! Member
From: Venezuela
Registered: 2012-02-29
Posts: 83

Re: Yep.

Welcome to this community. Your history move to tears. I hope you suceed in all you desire!! cry


"If you can?” said Jesus. “Everything is possible for one who believes.”  Mark 9:23
Jesus looked at them and said, “With man this is impossible, but not with God; all things are possible with God.”  Mark 10:27

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