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#376 2012-03-21 12:49:55

2ManyDogs
dv#!
From: elsewhere
Registered: 2011-11-22
Posts: 1,346

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

kri5 wrote:

@2ManyDogs et all...
Does DWM generate it's own .desktop file?
As i went through the process by 'el_k' with the addition of changing my /etc/apt/sources.list as per foxys post and DWM does not appear in the GDM sessions list so I checked and there is no .desktop for it. sad
Don't see anything in your review so I though it did, so has something gone wrong?


Sorry -- I mentioned how to create .desktop files in so many other reviews and just forgot that one. I'll add a link to one of the other reviews that discusses it.

Glad you got it all working.


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#377 2012-03-21 13:00:24

kri5
#! Die Hard
From: L.G.C. UK
Registered: 2011-11-10
Posts: 568

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

^No worries, just though I might have done something wrong somewhere. lol
Gone have read your instructions on a creating a startup script, as i need to get my WiFi working now.

P.S.  Looking forward to the next review. big_smile


#! Waldorf - 64bit - Xfce

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#378 2012-03-21 14:02:58

2ManyDogs
dv#!
From: elsewhere
Registered: 2011-11-22
Posts: 1,346

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

Day 17. Two more tilers from the people at "distro X." This will be a short review, as these two are very similar to the ones we looked at yesterday (but more sophisticated) and I have to go to work today (yes, I do work occasionally). I promise something longer and more interesting tomorrow.

Like the two we looked at yesterday, both of the window managers we'll see today must be built from source, and both are on github. I'll provide links at the end, and if you don't know how to build with git just go back and look at the end of yesterday's review. Both of today's window managers should be configured before they are built.

Snapwm

First up is snapwm. Snapwm is dminiwm all grown up. It was written by the same developer, and has many of the same default behaviors and options. There are some minor differences; desktops may be named (instead of just numbered) for example, but there are two big differences. First is that snapwm has a built-in panel that shows the available workspaces and whether there are running apps in them. Second is that snapwm has a run-time config file that can be changed and reloaded while snapwm is running. Some things cannot be changed in the runtime config file (key bindings, for example) but many of the visual elements and behaviors can be changed without rebuilding. The run-time config file is located at ~/.snapwmrc (but this name may be changed in config.h when snapwm is built), and a sample config file is provided with the source code. Values in .snapwmrc override any settings in config.h.

Like dminiwm, snapwm does right-side and bottom stacked tiles, grid, and monocle mode. It has most of the same basic default key binds, and it can start apps on specific workspaces with the option to also switch to that workspace when the app starts.

Snapwm in bottom-stack mode:

2012_03_19_164351_1280x1024_scrot.jpg

Snapwm running in grid mode, showing the .snapwmrc file in the upper left panel and part of the config.h file in the lower-left panel.

2012_03_20_063750_1280x1024_scrot.jpg

The right side of the panel shows the root-window title, so adding conky to the bar is as simple as adding this to the startup script:

(conky | while read LINE; do xsetroot -name "$LINE"; done ) &

What I Like About It

It does bottom stacking. It has a nice built-in status bar that shows workspaces with running apps. It has a run-time config file. It's in active development.

What I Don't Like About It

It has the same attach-aside problem I had with dminiwm. I can make it start new windows in the tile area instead of the master, but I can't make it give those windows focus. I'd like to be able to change key binds in the runtime config file. It's in active development, so there are bound to be bugs.

Links

snapwm on github
snapwm in the Arch wiki
dminiwm/snapwm on the Arch forum

Monsterwm

Next is monsterwm. Monsterwm makes space for a panel, but does not provide one of its own. There is code in the Arch wiki for a very nice panel, but I could only get this running on my Arch box. On #! I could only put conky in the status space. Someone with more coding experience could probably get the statusbar working on #!.

Like snapwm, monsterwm can do right-side stacked tiles, bottom stack, grid, and monocle mode. Its default mode can be set in the config file, but monsterwm also has a few more config options than snapwm. Its default panel size can be changed as well as the workspace on which monsterwm first starts. It can move apps from one desktop to another, but it does not have the "follow client to desktop" option that snapwm has.

Monsterwm also does not have a run time config file -- all changes must be made by changing the config.h file and rebuilding. Its default keybindings are slightly different from snapwm, but of course these can all be changed.

Here is monsterwm running on my Arch box with its panel. Notice that this panel can also show which desktops have apps running in them, but it is not included with the default monsterwm code.

2012_03_17_123358_1280x1024_scrot.jpg

The big difference between monsterwm and snapwm is that monsterwm can manage floating windows. Windows can be dragged out of the desktop by alt-left-clik and drag, and then resized with alt-right-click and drag. Reselecting the appropriate mode with the keyboard returns the window to its previous spot in the tiled layout. Here is monsterwm with some floating windows:

2012_03_19_180520_1280x1024_scrot.jpg

There are also a few patches available for monsterwm. One patch adds the "fibonacci" layout mode, where additional tiles get smaller. Here is monsterwm running in fibonacci mode on my #! test box, with conky on the panel:

2012_03_20_061623_1280x1024_scrot.jpg

What I Like About It

I like its name. Its "attach aside" behavior is what I expect -- new windows get the focus. It is still in active development.

What I Don't Like About It

I wish its panel was a default, rather than an add-on. It is still in very active development, so there are bound to be bugs.

Links

monsterwm on github
monsterwm in the Arch wiki
monsterwm on the Arch forum

tomorrow: musca
back to the top

Last edited by 2ManyDogs (2012-03-22 13:30:43)


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#379 2012-03-21 18:46:45

el_koraco
#!/loony/bun
From: inside Ed
Registered: 2011-07-25
Posts: 4,749

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

kri5 wrote:

Gone have read your instructions on a creating a startup script, as i need to get my WiFi working now.

http://crunchbanglinux.org/forums/post/102844/#p102844

just adapt it to your needs.

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#380 2012-03-21 18:58:38

kri5
#! Die Hard
From: L.G.C. UK
Registered: 2011-11-10
Posts: 568

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

^ thanks, I have got the startup script and wifi sorted now. Just wondering if I should be adding Xfce power manager to the startup to? And what about the alsa mixer/ volume control?


#! Waldorf - 64bit - Xfce

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#381 2012-03-21 19:34:13

ivanovnegro
Ivan #000000
From: unstable madness
Registered: 2011-06-02
Posts: 5,429

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

@kri5: Why not adding the Xfce power manager, if you need it and it is very convenient, of course you could go without.

For the volume control, easy, just use alsamixer from the terminal or at least make some keybindings to access the volume with your keyboard. I do not use DWM, so I cannot be more precise but it should be similar like in Scrotwm.

I have this as keybindings to control the volume:

program[VolumeUp]     = amixer sset Master,0 1+
bind[VolumeUp]        = XF86AudioRaiseVolume
program[VolumeDown]     = amixer sset Master,0 3-
bind[VolumeDown]        = XF86AudioLowerVolume

It would be the same on DWM but the configuration is different.

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#382 2012-03-21 19:44:50

kri5
#! Die Hard
From: L.G.C. UK
Registered: 2011-11-10
Posts: 568

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

@Ivanovegro..  Noob time again, I have those keybinds already in Openbox, I presume they won't work unless I specifically set them in DWM or what ever WM I'm using?


#! Waldorf - 64bit - Xfce

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#383 2012-03-21 20:00:50

ivanovnegro
Ivan #000000
From: unstable madness
Registered: 2011-06-02
Posts: 5,429

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

Yes, you have to set them with the right syntax for DWM.

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#384 2012-03-21 20:07:44

el_koraco
#!/loony/bun
From: inside Ed
Registered: 2011-07-25
Posts: 4,749

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

2ManyDogs wrote:

Day 17. Two more tilers from the people at "distro X."

AngryTurtleZoom.jpg.scaled500.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=AKIAJFZAE65UYRT34AOQ&Expires=1332360716&Signature=rUkx6YlK8bHgu6zcuxXxA2PZhpM%3D

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#385 2012-03-21 20:14:35

kri5
#! Die Hard
From: L.G.C. UK
Registered: 2011-11-10
Posts: 568

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

^ Cheers, shall have to look into that then.  I'm guessing there are more scrotwm users than DWM on here, perhaps that would have been better for getting my toes wet.  lol


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#386 2012-03-21 21:54:10

pucko
Member
From: ‽
Registered: 2012-03-11
Posts: 39

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

Thank you for the nice review, 2MD. Very nice WM's. My distrohopping days are over(debian is the shi#!) but my WM-hopping days has just begun. You're giving an awesome lecture to the possibilities we all have to explore GNU/Linux...

Keep the sweetness coming.

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#387 2012-03-22 01:11:58

gutterslob
#! Resident Bum
Registered: 2009-11-03
Posts: 3,116

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

Nice double-feature, Woofster.
Much thanks for the philanthropy.

Just a note....
Your link to snapwm's github page returns a 404.
This should be the correct page, I think: https://github.com/moetunes/Nextwm

Looks like @moetunes cleaned up the files a bit. Tidy stuff!!
Also, according to the thread on the Arch forums, he seems to have fixed that random crashing/segfaulting in fullscreen mode which I experienced the last time. I'll give this one another chance when I find the time.

Send my regards and well wishes if/when you see moetunes in the Arch forums.


Point & Squirt

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#388 2012-03-22 01:26:20

PackRat
#! Die Hard
From: USA
Registered: 2011-03-03
Posts: 1,355

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

kri5 wrote:

@Ivanovegro..  Noob time again, I have those keybinds already in Openbox, I presume they won't work unless I specifically set them in DWM or what ever WM I'm using?

Like Ivan said, you'll need dwm syntax; this is what I had to add to the appropriate sections of the config.h:

/* commands */
static const char *vup[] = { "amixer", "sset", "Master", "2+", NULL };
static const char *vdn[] = { "amixer", "sset", "Master", "2-", NULL };
static const char *vmt[] = { "amixer", "sset", "Master", "toggle", NULL };

static Key keys[] = {
    { 0,                            0x1008ff12, spawn,         {.v = vmt } },
    { 0,                            0x1008ff11, spawn,         {.v = vdn } },
    { 0,                            0x1008ff13, spawn,         {.v = vup } },

dwm does not accept the "XF86" keys (on my system anyway) so I used xev to get the 0x----- keysym. Working just fine on my Debian Testing system, Dwm from mercurial.

Should probably start the "Getting Started with Dwm thread so we don't hijack this one.

Awesome work 2ManyDogs - looking forward to more.

Last edited by PackRat (2012-03-22 01:29:11)


"It does not require many words to speak the truth." - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce tribe

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#389 2012-03-22 01:42:12

2ManyDogs
dv#!
From: elsewhere
Registered: 2011-11-22
Posts: 1,346

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

gutterslob wrote:

Nice double-feature, Woofster.
Much thanks for the philanthropy.

Just a note....
Your link to snapwm's github page returns a 404.
This should be the correct page, I think: https://github.com/moetunes/Nextwm

Looks like @moetunes cleaned up the files a bit. Tidy stuff!!
Also, according to the thread on the Arch forums, he seems to have fixed that random crashing/segfaulting in fullscreen mode which I experienced the last time. I'll give this one another chance when I find the time.

Send my regards and well wishes if/when you see moetunes in the Arch forums.

thanks gs. I fixed the link.


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#390 2012-03-22 08:42:08

el_koraco
#!/loony/bun
From: inside Ed
Registered: 2011-07-25
Posts: 4,749

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

PackRat wrote:

Should probably start the "Getting Started with Dwm thread so we don't hijack this one.

Getting Started with Dwm, or How To Purge Your System from BSD Influences.

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#391 2012-03-22 10:04:13

gensym
#! Junkie
Registered: 2011-10-17
Posts: 447

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

@PackRat

The XF86 keys are declared in  XF86keysym.h, try adding this line to the config.h (right at the beginning)

#include <X11/XF86keysym.h>

and referring the XF86 keys as XF86XK_{FUNCTION}.

PS: I am not on my linux box right now, so I can't just try this out -- sorry if it does not work.

Last edited by gensym (2012-03-22 10:05:14)


'Multiple exclamation marks,' he went on, shaking his head, 'are a sure sign of a diseased mind.', {Eric}

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#392 2012-03-22 11:42:27

gutterslob
#! Resident Bum
Registered: 2009-11-03
Posts: 3,116

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

el_koraco wrote:

....BSD Influences.

Hah!!
I'm currently doing a simulation in my head (cos I lack the time in real life) of how I'm going to edit SnapWM's config.h in order to get the keybindings similar to those in SpectrWM. tongue

Might go further. Some of the SnapWM functions are a bit too vaguely annotated/defined (typical Linux), but if I figure out enough I might try making a personal fork of it one of these days, Just hoping it won't segfault to oblivion and die out like my old (before you joined this forum, probably) MongrelWM project  hmm


Point & Squirt

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#393 2012-03-22 12:31:03

SlowMutant
#! CrunchBanger
From: End-World
Registered: 2012-02-26
Posts: 138

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

I cannot keep up with this thread, too much information!
I will read it when I have more time...


Nothing 'real' is solid.

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#394 2012-03-22 12:38:39

kri5
#! Die Hard
From: L.G.C. UK
Registered: 2011-11-10
Posts: 568

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

PackRat wrote:

Like Ivan said, you'll need dwm syntax; this is what I had to add to the appropriate sections of the config.h:

/* commands */
static const char *vup[] = { "amixer", "sset", "Master", "2+", NULL };
static const char *vdn[] = { "amixer", "sset", "Master", "2-", NULL };
static const char *vmt[] = { "amixer", "sset", "Master", "toggle", NULL };

static Key keys[] = {
    { 0,                            0x1008ff12, spawn,         {.v = vmt } },
    { 0,                            0x1008ff11, spawn,         {.v = vdn } },
    { 0,                            0x1008ff13, spawn,         {.v = vup } },

dwm does not accept the "XF86" keys (on my system anyway) so I used xev to get the 0x----- keysym. Working just fine on my Debian Testing system, Dwm from mercurial.

Thanks for that PackRat.  big_smile


#! Waldorf - 64bit - Xfce

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#395 2012-03-22 13:12:05

2ManyDogs
dv#!
From: elsewhere
Registered: 2011-11-22
Posts: 1,346

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

Day 18. Today we are going to look at a window manager that's a little bit stranger than most (but not as strange as some!). It's called musca, and it's named for a constellation, but means "fly" in Latin. Here's what the developer has to say:

But why do this when there are 17 million other window managers already swanning about the internet? Variety is the spice of life? Actually, ratpoison is very good and I used it for many years; but, I always wanted it to be just a little bit more friendly to the mouse, and just a little bit more informative about frame focus and layout, and just a little bit less modal (I can't think of a better way to say that) everywhere. Sleek little dwm is also great, and while it does focus-follow-mouse and has nice minimal yet informative frame borders, it can't do manual frame layouts and I couldn't add the feature to it satisfactorily (probably my fault). Other options like Ion3 and Xmonad were also fun, but ultimately had fluff of one sort or another. So, here is Musca: the strange offspring of ratpoison and dwm, and very likely only suited to my preferences ;-) Oh well.

Why is it named after a star constellation?

    So it didn't have "wm" in the name.
    Why not?

Musca is a manual tiling window manager (but it can also manage floating windows, and operate as a stacking window manager, as we will see). Unlike dwm, scrotwm, and most other tiling window managers, musca does not create new tiles until you tell it to. This makes it very interesting and a little strange at first, but it has so many intuitive key binds and so many unique features that it is not hard to get used to once you understand what it is doing.

Musca is not in the repos, but it is not hard to download and build, especially now that we have gensym's excellent how-to. To make it show up in GDM's sessions list, you must create a .desktop file for it. Refer to this review for more information if you don't know how to do this. Musca can be reconfigured and rebuilt if necessary, but it can also use a run-time config file for most of its options. The online documentation is excellent, and for this one you definitely want to look through the docs and online tutorials before you start it up.

First, some terminology. Musca calls a virtual desktop a "group." Each group can contain one or more tiles, called "frames." An application runs in a "window." When a window is in a frame, the window is visible (think of windows like pictures you put in a frame). A group can contain more than one frame, and can contain more windows than frames (or fewer). If there are more frames than windows, some of the frames will be empty, unless we make more windows(start more apps) to fill them. If there are more windows than frames, some of the windows will be hidden, unless we make more frames or hide some visible windows. If you've used ratpoison, you'll see that this terminology and behavior is similar but slightly different.

When you first start musca, you get a black screen with a blue border. This is a single large empty frame. By default, the super key is the mod key, and mod+t is already bound to xterm, so pressing mod+t gets you a terminal.

So now we have a terminal running, and we want to start iceweasel. This is easily done with dmenu. Mod+x is the standard dmenu. Iceweasel starts full screen, because there's still only one frame. Remember, musca doesn't create new frames when we start new apps, so the terminal window is there, it's just not visible. If we want the terminal back, we can "raise" the hidden window with the mod+c key combination; because there's still only one frame, raising xterm hides iceweasel. Pressing mod+c repeatedly cycles through the hidden windows in the group. You can also navigate through the all the windows in the current group with the musca windows menu. Pressing mod+w starts a menu on the bottom of the screen which shows all the windows in the current group even if they are not currently visible.

If we want to have both iceweasel and the terminal visible at the same time, we have to create a new frame; the easiest way to do this is just to split the existing frame to make two frames: mod+h splits the frame along the horizontal axis (creating two frames left and right) and mod+v splits the frame along the vertical axis, top and bottom. Now we can see both apps, and switch between them with the mod+arrow keys, or by selecting with the mouse. The selected frame has a blue border, other frames are grey. Frames can be resized (mod+ctrl+arrow key resizes the frame in the selected direction), and the contents can be switched from one frame to another. If we split a frame (creating a new frame) and there are no more hidden windows available, the new frame is empty. If you're using a desktop background image, the image will be visible; otherwise the empty frame appears black. This screen shot shows an empty frame (where the mouse pointer is located); you can see the desktop background:

2012_03_22_062621_1280x1024_scrot.jpg

If you close a running app (close its window), a hidden window from the group will be raised to fill the frame. If there are no more hidden windows (because there are now more frames than windows in the group), the frame becomes empty, and adjacent frames are not resized to fill the gap. Mod+r "removes" a frame and resizes the remaining frames to fill the gap. If the removed frame was not empty, its window joins the hidden windows in the group, and the window may be "raised" in any frame in the group. Mod+u causes the most recent frame removal to be undone, even if the frame was empty when it was removed. This may all sound confusing, but the default key bindings are very intuitive, and you will pick it up quickly once you start playing with it. There is also a very good tutorial on the web site.

You can navigate around the using the screen key sequences mod+(up, down, left, right). Frames can be resized with mod+ctrl+(up, down, left, right). Windows can be swapped with adjacent frames with mod+shift+(up, down, left, right).

By default, musca only creates one group. More groups can be created with the "add" command from the musca commands menu (mod+m), from the groups menu (mod+g), or at startup by placing the appropriate command in the ~/.musca_start file. You can switch between groups either by using the mod+page-up and mod+page-down sequences, or by using the musca groups menu. Pressing mod+g shows a list of groups at the bottom of the screen (another dmenu), and the left and right arrow keys can be used to select a group, or a group may be selected by name. Typing the name of a group not already created will create a new group with that name. Groups may also be created, renamed, or moved into using the musca commands menu. You can see the groups menu at the bottom of the screen in this screen shot:

2012_03_21_064348_1280x1024_scrot.jpg

You can see that I tended to use musca with a large frame on the top and smaller frames below (like the other tilers I'm used to), but a very wide variety of layouts can be produced. And if you are confused by now, believe me that musca can be very simple to use. It has a lot of features that make it very powerful, but it can also be used in a very simple way, with only one desktop, as a simple manual tiler.

Musca has a sophisticated "commands" menu -- all of the commands that are bound to keys (and more) can be run from the commands menu (started with mod+m). Windows may be selected, deselected, resized, and moved, groups can be added, renamed, or removed, and many other options. Even key bindings can be changed from the commands menu while musca is running.

Any command that may be used from the commands menu may also be placed in the ~/.musca_start file. I only changed a few things, but there are online examples where people remap most of the keys and execute several commands at startup (creating several groups and several frames in each group, for example). This start file creates four named groups, and starts musca on the group named "one." It then splits the group into three frames, with one large frame above two smaller frames, and binds some custom key sequences:

add one
add two
add web
add code

use one
vsplit 2/3
focus down
hsplit 2/3

bind on mod4+t exec sakura
bind on mod4+shift+w exec luakit

Finally, if all this isn't strange enough, musca can also manage floating windows and use panels like a traditional stacking window manager. Here is musca running with floating windows, conky, and fbpanel:

2012_03_19_171443_1280x1024_scrot.jpg

I really liked this one, and may return to it after the 30-day experiment.

What I Liked

It's weird, but in a way I found very intuitive. The default key binds made sense (mod+t for a terminal, instead of the more common mod+shift+return) and other features were easy to understand and easy to learn, even though it feels very strange at first. I know I don't understand everything musca can do, but it's still very usable as a basic tiling window manager. I liked that it puts borders around frames and highlights the active frame. I like that it uses the same commands in its commands menu and in its startup file.

What I Didn't Like

At first I wished it had some sort of status bar, at least showing the name of the current group, but as I used the groups menu I realized that it was simple to just press mod+g to see a list of groups with an asterisk next to the current group. I believe there are ways to create a status bar using dzen2, but I haven't tried this*. Otherwise I can't find much fault with it, but I think the floating/stacking mode is a bit unnecessary.

*edit: see this post for more on using conky with musca.

Links

musca home page
musca tutorial
musca in the Arch wiki
musca on the Arch forum
musca search on the #! forum

back to the top

Last edited by 2ManyDogs (2012-03-26 20:59:18)


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#396 2012-03-22 14:11:41

PackRat
#! Die Hard
From: USA
Registered: 2011-03-03
Posts: 1,355

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

gensym wrote:

@PackRat

The XF86 keys are declared in  XF86keysym.h, try adding this line to the config.h (right at the beginning)

#include <X11/XF86keysym.h>

and referring the XF86 keys as XF86XK_{FUNCTION}.

PS: I am not on my linux box right now, so I can't just try this out -- sorry if it does not work.

Thanks; I found this solution as well, but tried the other method first. Worth knowing both.

@kri5 - No problem. Just for clarity though, the "0" static Key section is a place holder so that a MODKEY isn't needed (is there a formal term for that?) - it's not as if "0" is being used as a MODKEY.

@2ManyDogs - another good review.

Last edited by PackRat (2012-03-22 14:12:01)


"It does not require many words to speak the truth." - Chief Joseph, Nez Perce tribe

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#397 2012-03-22 14:15:25

el_koraco
#!/loony/bun
From: inside Ed
Registered: 2011-07-25
Posts: 4,749

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

gutterslob wrote:

Might go further. Some of the SnapWM functions are a bit too vaguely annotated/defined (typical Linux), but if I figure out enough I might try making a personal fork of it one of these days, Just hoping it won't segfault to oblivion and die out like my old (before you joined this forum, probably) MongrelWM project  hmm

We'll run debug lines and come up with workarounds for the segfaulting. I myself have little time for fiddling with dwm, but I've ported most of my shortcuts for now. i just gotta figure out why the attach to side patch isn't working, and I'm good to go really.

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#398 2012-03-22 15:54:32

ivanovnegro
Ivan #000000
From: unstable madness
Registered: 2011-06-02
Posts: 5,429

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

PackRat wrote:

Should probably start the "Getting Started with Dwm thread so we don't hijack this one.

Yes, you should, you have my vote. smile

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#399 2012-03-22 19:42:43

kri5
#! Die Hard
From: L.G.C. UK
Registered: 2011-11-10
Posts: 568

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

ivanovegro wrote:

PackRat wrote:
Should probably start the "Getting Started with Dwm thread so we don't hijack this one.
Yes, you should, you have my vote.

+1 here.

@2ManyDogs..  Another great review, Musca looks very interesting.  You're presenting me with to many options, oh what to do, which to install and try?  The sessions list in GDM is getting longer and longer and longer.....


#! Waldorf - 64bit - Xfce

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#400 2012-03-22 19:47:12

2ManyDogs
dv#!
From: elsewhere
Registered: 2011-11-22
Posts: 1,346

Re: 30 Window Managers in 30 days

kri5 wrote:

@2ManyDogs..  Another great review, Musca looks very interesting.  You're presenting me with to many options, oh what to do, which to install and try?  The sessions list in GDM is getting longer and longer and longer.....

If the sessions list doesn't have a scroll bar yet, you're not really trying. smile


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